Reception, Elegy, and Eco-Awareness: Trees in Statius, Boccaccio, and Chaucer

Material TypeArticleLanguageEnglish
TitleReception, Elegy, and Eco-Awareness: Trees in Statius, Boccaccio, and Chaucer Author(S)Brenda Deen Schildgen (Author)
Abstract  The essay examines a specific case of “wood-stripping” that occurs in three related texts: one ancient, Statius's Thebaid, and two medieval romance versions of Statius's poem, Giovanni Boccaccio's La Teseida and Geoffrey Chaucer's The Knight's Tale. It argues that all three writers are gazers at nature (in the sense that they situate action in a natural environment that they make visible), by adopting an “affective fallacy” (traditionally called the “pathetic fallacy”) they also convey the “feelings” of the natural world (in this case, its sorrow, suffering, and mourning). In doing so, they become co-partners, even “co-sufferers” or mourners, in the feelings of natural phenomena. ...Paginationp 85-100
SubjectLiteratureDescriptorsLiterature, Comparative
Journal TitleComparative Literature  
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